Track One: "Big Picture" Stormwater

Track1
Stormwater is rarely a local issue. In this track, the watershed and regional aspects of stormwater management and permit requirements was examined. Through partnerships and research, municipalities learned from the permitting process and observations of local processes.

Presentation materials are provided as PDF and compressed (zip) formats to account for download limits.

  • 2014/15 Stormwater Manual and Code Updates: Key Tools and Lessons from Phase I Jurisdictions (Panel Discussion)
Presented by: Sherell Ehlers (City of Seattle), Mieke Hoppin (City of Tacoma), Mark Wilgus (King County) Dennis Dixon (Pierce County)
NPDES Phase I Municipal permittees are in the process of updating their stormwater codes and manuals to comply with the requirements of the latest NPDES permit requirements. Several Phase I permittees will present a summary of notable lessons and tools that have been developed as part of these recent updates.

Seattle 2015 Stormwater Code and Manual Update
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

City of Tacoma Code and Manual Update
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

King County Challenges, Tools, and Lessons Learned Adapting Ecology MR#5
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

King County Surface Water Design Manual Update Advisory Group Meeting
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Phase 1 Lessons Learned: Pierce County's SWM Manual Update Adventures
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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Presenter Contact Info
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide, zip format 1 slide)

  • Permeable Pavement Design and Maintenance: Municipal Lessons and Observations
Presented by: Mark Palmer (City of Puyallup), Jessica Knickerbocker (City of Tacoma), Tim Horton (Skillings Connolly)
Implementation and shared knowledge on permeable pavements can be a barrier to further use of such systems for on-site stormwater management. It’s understandable why there is an inherent resistance to these new methods. As we move forward with new designs influenced by Low Impact Development and policies designed to protect natural spaces within and around our communities, engineers will be challenged to shed traditional design methods for new innovative designs. Pervious pavement is one method in the engineers’ tool box used to implement LID techniques.

Stormwater Takes the Lead in Sustainable Roads
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Porous Asphalt: Design and Construction Challenges and Opportunities
Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Porous HMA Standard Specification (PDF)

Draft Special Provision for Porous Hot Mix Asphalt (PDF)

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  • A Direct-to-Implementation Approach to Toxics Reduction in the Spokane River
Presented by: Lynn Schmidt (Stormwater Permit Coordinator, City of Spokane), Adriane Borgias (Water Quality Lead (Spokane River) Department of Ecology)
The Spokane River community has engaged in an innovative direct-to-implementation approach to address toxics in the watershed. Collaboration with other entities on a watershed scale is a cornerstone of making progress in toxics reductions. Local municipal and industrial dischargers along with regulators, state entities, and environmental organizations formed the Spokane River Regional Toxics Task Force (SRRTTF), a direct-to-implementation alternative to the traditional TMDL process.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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  • Re-Envisioning Treatment and Flow Control in Tacoma: The Regional Approach
Presented by: Dana de Leon P.E. (City of Tacoma, Environmental Services)
Redevelopment in Tacoma can be complex in our highly-urbanized area. The complexities are driven by limited space, aging infrastructure, and lower rents in comparison to other urban areas. Ease of development and more lucrative rents can drive development elsewhere.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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  • Using an Ecological Recovery Approach to Stormwater Permit Regulations
Presented by: Andy Rheaume (Senior Planner, City of Redmond), Ed O’Brien (Department of Ecology), Heather Ballash (Department of Commerce), John Lenth (Herrera Environmental Consultants)
The municipal stormwater permits establish minimum requirements for permittees to address stormwater impacts from new development and redevelopment through the implementation of programmatic and structural best management practices (BMPs). In theory, if these BMPs are applied to all the developed land in a watershed, the receiving water would be protected from stormwater related hydrologic and water-quality impacts. While the effectiveness of stormwater BMPs has been well-documented on the site scale, limited data exists nationally on the effectiveness of these controls in aggregate for actually protecting conditions in receiving waters.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

  • Improving Stormwater Quality in an Urban Watershed
Presented by: Lorna Mauren P.E. (City of Tacoma Environmental Services Department)
Located in the heart of downtown Tacoma, the Thea Foss Waterway was once characterized by oil sheens, coal tar deposits and dilapidated buildings. In 1985, the EPA declared the waterway a Superfund site. In 2006,  the City of Tacoma and its partners completed a $105 million remediation of the waterway.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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  • Innovative Partnerships to Achieve and Exceed NPDES Permit Requirements
Presented by: Kate Riley (Program Manager, Snohomish Conservation District), Teresa Brooks (Kitsap Conservation District), Melissa Buckingham (Pierce Conservation District), Kara Kaelber (Franklin Conservation District), associated partner jurisdictions
Partnering with a Conservation District has enabled many jurisdictions to not only meet but exceed their permit requirements, by creating forward-thinking programming within their communities. The four conservation districts represented have relationships with almost twenty Phase I and II jurisdictions in Washington, and are successful because of their cost-effective services, access to private landowners, and innovative outreach strategies.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Watch the Video.