Track Three: Stormwater Research and News

Track3

In this ever-changing and dynamic field, new research can have a profound affect on stormwater management, education  and outreach, and testing.

Presentation materials are provided as PDF and compressed (zip) formats to account for download limits.

  • STORM: Collective Impact for Stormwater Education, Outreach & Beyond

Presented by: Stef Frenzl (Communication Specialist II, Snohomish County)
Nobody wants to unknowingly recreate the wheel from scratch, yet we see it happen more often than we’d like to admit. Even worse, well-intentioned people with the same goal sometimes get in each other’s way, and projects can get caught in the crossfire. How can we prevent these problems from happening? One solution is through Collective Impact, a structured form of collaboration that embraces continuous improvement and rigorous data to drive transformative change.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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  • Recent GROSS and Other Grant Projects: Where Are They Now?

Presented by: Dan Gariepy (Department of Ecology)
The State Legislature and the Department of Ecology has invested in grant programs to help improve the water bodies impacted by stormwater across our state. This presentation will focus on a few of the programs and delve into some case studies on how those funds have turned into projects.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Watch the Video.

  • Alternative Fecal Coliform and Stormwater Testing Methods

Presented by: Simon A. Smith (Research Scientist, University of Idaho), Rob Buchert (City of Pullman), Shilo Sprouse (City of Pullman)
The City of Pullman (WA) has an active stormwater management program focused on improving water quality, infrastructure, and public awareness, to facilitate compliance with NPDES Phase II MSP requirements. One of the program’s water quality priorities is to reduce the fecal coliform (FC) counts entering its stormwater collection system, and the City has performed several stormwater system monitoring studies to achieve this goal.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

  • The Sweet Smell of Success: Finding and Eliminating Illicit Connections in Seattle

Presented by: Adam Bailey (City of Seattle)
Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination (IDDE) is a permit stipulation that all NPDES Phase I and II permitees are required to meet. While many municipalities and counties have had limited success in locating sources of pollution through their respective IDDE programs, the City of Seattle has had great success in locating and eliminating scores of cross connections by utilizing a different approach to IDDE which is both basic and thorough.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Smoke Testing: What it Looks Like (Video)

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  • Pilot Testing of New Techniques for Illicit Discharge Detection

Presented by: Debra Bouchard (Water Quality Planner III, King County), Jeanne Dorn (Water Quality Project/ Program Manager III, King County)
 King County, the City of Seattle, and the City of Kirkland collaborated on field testing canine scent tracking in Thornton and Juanita Creek watersheds in May 2014 - combining the two urban creeks into one study design. Canine scent-work results will be compared against laboratory analytical results to evaluate scent tracking reliability.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

In late 2013, staff in the Stormwater Services’ group of King County, Washington State, learned of a field technique (the Mobile Water Kit) developed for rapid detection of total coliform and E. coli bacteria in water.  County staff collaborated with staff from the University of Alberta to perform a preliminary pilot field test of this method in King County in late June 2014.  Water samples from natural surface waters and stormwater conveyance systems were tested by both the newly developed rapid field technique and by conventional lab tests, to assess if the technique could be reliably used in the field for various program needs.  The principal finding of the pilot study is that the Mobile Water Kit field technique requires further refinement in order for it to be useful as a bacteria screening tool for surface water and stormwater conveyance systems.

View the Mobile Water Kit pilot test document.
  • FC TMDL Bacteria Source Screening: Approaches by King County

Presented by: Jeanne Dorn (Water Quality Project/Program Manager III, King County)
Appendix 2 of the 2013-2018 Phase I NPDES Municipal Permit requires that King County performs specific tasks related to fecal coliform total maximum daily loads (FC TMDLs). King County Stormwater Services Section has begun implementing a bacteria source screening program in the first of its Appendix 2 FC TMDL areas, the Puyallup River Watershed.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Watch the Video.

  • Results from Current Research on Pollutant Export from Bioretention Systems and Next Steps

Presented by: Chris May (Stormwater Division Senior Program Manager, Kitsap County Public Works), Andy Rheaume (City of Redmond),  Doug Howie (Department of Ecology), Curtis Hinman, Dylan Ahearn, and John Lenth (Herrera Environmental Consultants)
 Infiltrating stormwater onsite helps achieve the low impact development (LID) objective of more closely mimicking pre-disturbance hydrology. Bioretention and rain gardens are two of the most common onsite best management practices (BMPs) used to meet the objectives of LID due to their hydrologic benefits. Early research from the east coast also indicated that these BMPs provide pollutant reduction benefits.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Watch the Video.