Track Two: Stormwater Program Efficiencies Now

Track2

Stormwater can be a complex and involved topic. In this track, real world examples and methods for integrating public education and outreach, inspections, efficiencies, and spill reporting were highlighted.

Presentation materials are provided as PDF and compressed (zip) formats to account for download limits.

  • Trash Compactors: Eliminating a Major Source of Stormwater Pollution

Presented by: Dan Smith (Surface Water Quality Program Coordinator, City of Federal Way)
 The City of Federal Way Surface Water Management (SWM) division has identified areas where solid and liquid wastes are handled, stored, and ultimately transferred to disposal company trash receptacles (specifically trash compactors) as significant contributors of stormwater pollution. As a result, appropriate and reasonable water quality code enforcement aimed at eliminating these sources has been carried out per requirements specified in the city’s Phase II Western Washington Municipal Stormwater NPDES Permit.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

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  • Integrating IDDE, Public Education, Inspections, and Spill Reporting

Presented by: Mindy Fohn (Water Quality Manager, Kitsap County)
 Kitsap County Public Works has evolved outfall screening, spill reporting and facility inspection programs gradually since 1995 so that now and in the future they operate as one integrated approach. Upon review of the outcomes and effectiveness of the outfall screening program, spill hotline reporting and other inspection programs such as commercial facilities and septic inspections, it was determined that real gains were made with an “eyes on the ground” approach rather than visual and chemical screening of outfalls.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Presentation Portfolio (PDF) This contains the materials mentioned in the presentation.

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  • EPA NPDES Audits: Summary and Lessons from Ecology and Phase I Permittees (Panel Discussion)
  • Rachel McCrea, Department of Ecology. Bill Leif, Snohomish County. Lorna Mauren, City of Tacoma. Doug Navetski, King County. Kate Rhoads, City of Seattle.
    NPDES Phase I Municipal permittees recently went through audits of their permit-required activities. This Panel Discussion will include an introduction from Ecology to provide context for the EPA audits, followed by discussion among the panel members specific to the key challenges and lessons from the audit preparation, as well as significant outcomes and lessons that resulted from the audits. The information will be generally informative to permittees and other stormwater professionals, but in particular will help Phase II permittees understand the realities of the audit process and the effects on permit compliance activities.


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  • Utilizing Asset Management Data Based Systems to Meet NPDES Requirements

Presented by: Don Robinett (Stormwater Compliance Manager, City of SeaTac)
One of the most time consuming, and at times, exhausting requirements of the municipal stormwater permits is the need for program tracking and reporting. While most jurisdictions have permit tracking database systems, many have not implemented this technology in their operations and maintenance (O&M) or illicit discharge detection and elimination (IDDE) programs.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

  • Private Facility Inspections: From Paper to High Definition

Presented by: Dan Repp (City of Shoreline)
NPDES Municipal Stormwater Permittees are required to inspect private stormwater facilities for maintenance purposes. Challenges in this type of inspection program can include: a growing work load with new development, communicating effectively with private property owners, and inaccurate mapping. Finding ways to streamline an inspection program that eases all of these challenges could benefit many permittees.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

  • Outfall and Discharge Point Screening Application

Presented by: Mark Preszler (King County), Jeanne Dorn (King County), Brett Randle (King County)
In order to meet requirements within the Phase I NPDES Municipal Stormwater Permit, King County created a mobile application for screening, collecting, and reclassifying its outfalls and discharge points. The Outfall and Discharge Point Screening Application is based on the new outfall and discharge point definitions recently proposed by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide, zip format 1 slide per page)

Watch the Video for the above three presentations.

  • City of Tacoma’s Catch Basin Assessment Program

Presented by: Michael Rose (Associate Engineer, City of Tacoma)
The City of Tacoma has done extensive work developing programs to track maintenance and forecast work in many areas of maintenance; however, when it came to catch basins the City’s program had missed the boat. The City realized the deficiency during a source tracing incident and an internal audit of our programs which identified a need to better track catch basin cleaning. In response to this need, the City of Tacoma has developed a fast, reliable, GIS-integrated program, which meets our needs for source tracing and compliance with Phase I NPDES permit catch basin operations and maintenance.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Phase 1 Permit

Powerpoint (PDF format, zip format)

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  • Building a Comprehensive Stormwater Retrofit Program

Presented by: Scott Murphy (Stormwater Retrofit Engineer, Kitsap County)
In June of 2009, the Kitsap County Commissioners adopted the “Water as a Resource” policy which recognized storm and surface water runoff as the leading transport medium of pollution into Puget Sound and its associated wetlands, creeks, streams and rivers. Additionally, local groundwater studies indicate that 80% of Kitsap County citizens obtain their drinking water from groundwater resources and these are only replenished by the infiltration of precipitation that falls on Kitsap County. This has caused us to expand and restructure our retrofit program to address these challenges and help ensure that we will have clean and adequate water resources to accommodate future growth.

Powerpoint slides (PDF format, 1 slide and 3 slides, zip format 1 slide and 3 slides per page)

Watch the Video.