Welcome to the Stormwater Channel

The Stormwater Channel includes videos produced by the Washington Stormwater Center, as well as links to other useful video resources! 

Stormwater Channel

Washington Stormwater Center YouTube Channel

Visit our YouTube channel to view many helpful and informative stormwater-related videos.  Know of additional videos we should link to?   Let us know!

Washington Stormwater Center Playlist Directory

For videos produced by the Washington Stormwater Center:
Washington Stormwater Center Videos

Other YouTube Channels About Stormwater

Concrete Solutions: carbon fiber paves a way to cleaner groundwater

Watch WSU and the Washington Stormwater Center team up with Boeing to test carbon fiber in permeable pavement. View the video.

Videos for Elected Officials

These short videos are designed for elected and other appointed officials. They’ll help explain what Low Impact Development (LID) is, and how new stormwater permit requirements will present Washington communities with both challenges and new opportunities. Watch and learn why this matters to your community!

KIRO 7 Video Highlighting Stormwater Research at WSU Puyallup

WSU Study on Toxic Stormwater By KIRO 7 Correspondent, Jeff Dubois

King 5 Video highlighting Stormwater Research at WSU Puyallup

Runoff Gardens Save Fish and Water By King 5 Environmental Correspondent, Gary Chittam

How you can be part of the stormwater solution from the sightline institute.

Learn about rain gardens, cisterns, and more!

Sustainability Ambassadors: Toxics in Stormwater Pollution

Jenifer McIntyre, Research Scientist with the WSU Stormwater Center, describes the current science on the toxic chemicals entering Puget Sound from polluted storm water runoff with a focus on the susceptibility of aquatic animals like salmon. Current research on rain garden soil filtration points to solutions for reducing these toxics, leaving cleaner water with less impact on fish. Watch her video here.

WSU Puyallup's Jennifer McIntyre's research is highlighted in the NY Times

Storm runoff can be toxic to aquatic life, but a new study suggests a simple and relatively inexpensive solution: Filter the water through dirt before it enters streams, rivers or the ocean.

Researchers collected runoff from a busy four-lane highway in Seattle during six storms in 2011 and 2012. They tested the toxicity of water from the first five storms and found that coho salmon fry could not survive in it, nor could the mayfly and water flea larvae they feed on.

Read the full article by Nicholas Bakalar, New York Times.

Videos From Washington Stormwater Center Workshops

PBS Video on Research looking at the effects of stormwater runoff on fish

As part of the Low Impact Development (LID) research now underway at the Washington State University (WSU) Puyallup Research and Extension site, a science team, led by Jenifer McIntyre, is exploring the use of LID soils and plants to filter stormwater runoff.  The team is a joint collaboration between WSU, the US Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency.  Dr. McIntyre is a postdoctoral research associate at WSU Puyallup.
 
An initial report on the project was given at the 2012 WSU LID Research Program Annual Review.  When finished, results of this study will be disseminated to the scientific community and the public through a series of reports, peer-reviewed papers, the Washington Stormwater Center web site, and LID annual reviews held at WSU Puyallup. The results will give valuable data on the effectiveness of the most widely used LID technique (bioretention) to improve water quality and protecting receiving waters.
 
In a report by Oregon Public Broadcasting on October 17,2012, the work at the Washington Stormwater Center was highlighted in an interview with Dr. McIntyre. The article and associated video story can be found at: http://earthfix.opb.org/water/article/drained-how-we-got-into-such-a-mess-with-stormwate/

Washington Stormwater Center Videos


StormTrek

Join our Stormwater Superhero as she takes us on a journey to show us exactly where stormwater, and the pollution it carries, ends up.

Innovative Stormwater BMP: Oyster Shells

The Washington Stormwater Center is pleased to announce the second in our series of Innovative BMP Videos.  This video was produced in conjunction with the Port of Seattle, a leader in Industrial Stormwater Management.  In 2005, staff at the Port of Seattle invented an inexpensive, innovative and effective treatment method to remove copper from their stormwater runoff.  Watch this video to see how they did it, and learn how you can too.

Innovative Stormwater BMP: The Grattix

The Washington Stormwater Center is pleased to announce the first in our series of Innovative BMP Videos.  This video was produced in conjunction with the Port of Vancouver who is a leader in Industrial Stormwater Management.  In 2008, staff at the Port of Vancouver invented an inexpensive, innovative and effective treatment device to remove zinc from their stormwater runoff.  Watch this video to see how they did it, and learn how you can too.

Cleaning with Steam: Port of Seattle demo

A demonstration at the Port of Seattle shows how steam can be utilized to clean vehicles and other equipment, with no resulting stormwater discharges.

Adding Pollutant Sources to Your Site Map

The premiere S-Series Training video from Washington Stormwater Center. Follow this step-by-step guidance to identify areas of pollutant contact on your industrial site. Learn how to add pollutant sources to your site map.

Read more about this Site Map Requirement on our training page for special requirement: S3B1g